Stop the spread of nature centers: They are teaching our children to be anti-American terrorists

Just kidding.  What an absurd thing for me to  say.  However, just yesterday, in Silver Spring Maryland, an act of ecco-terrorism took place.  OK, so this  guy was a lone pathetic wack-job but we have had  those wing-nuts spiking trees out in California and occasionally Greenpeace steps a little over the line.  So do we have cause to label all environmentalists potentially dangerous? Do they all belong to a violent, hateful and anti-American cause?  Should the Audubon Society, World Wildlife Foundation and the Cousteau Society condemn the actions of this lunatic who attacked the Discovery Channel?

No more so than we should expect the Muslim community to be held accountable for the actions of Islamist terrorists.  If we are afraid to allow mosques into our community because of the violent actions of a very minute element of fringe Muslim radicals, then why not the same fear of nature centers? I’ll bet James J. Lee spent some considerable time in one or two when he was a child. Is this where the seeds of violence were planted?

Of course, you can bet some loon will try seriously try  to connect the Discovery Channel incident with environmentalists at large (which would include me).  Just as you can bet that a few misanthropic ecco-nuts will applaud this poor fool’s “courageous martyrdom”.  You will find misguided people everywhere.  But the exception does not, in these cases, prove the rule.

Advertisements

, , , ,

  1. #1 by 1sttime0ffender on September 2, 2010 - 12:37 pm

    I hope no one characterizes him as anything more than a mentally disturbed person who needed help. He commited an irrational act of violence. He was beyond being able to reason as a sane individual. I feel for his family and friends, if he had any.

    • #2 by Christian Beyer on September 2, 2010 - 12:41 pm

      Agreed. I hope you understand that my post was not really about him but about Islamophobics and their skewed logic.

  2. #3 by logiopathivorytowerdweller on September 2, 2010 - 12:40 pm

    Eco Terrosism? How about the economic terrorism committed by Eco-Freaks.

    For example, in California, farmers cannot irrigate fields, because water supplies have been cut off. Why? To protect a sardine-like fish called the Delta Smelt. The fish has a tendency to die when it goes through the pumps.

    Or how about the Stephens Kangaroo Rat?

    Keeping the Dominion Keepers from jobs and homes is the true terrorism.

    P. S. Why the prolific writing as of late?

    • #4 by Christian Beyer on September 2, 2010 - 12:47 pm

      It ain’t that black and white. This same type of argument has been used for years. Who would’ve thought that man made changes to inconsequential streams and brooks in northern PA would help to effect the decimation of the seafood industry in the Lower Chesapeake Bay?

      And….those farms in Salinas etc shouldn’t even be there. They’re draining the Colorado in order to grow food in a desert. Meanwhile our government buys up the tremendous surplus of food grown in the Midwest (also largely irrigated: the original “Great American Desert” ) yet the abundant natural farmland of the East is turned into housing tracts of McMansions and shopping malls while the cities go into decay.

      Not that simple, Brucie.

    • #5 by Christian Beyer on September 2, 2010 - 1:13 pm

      Consider the Delta Smelt and the Stephen’s Kanaroo Rat (and the Snail Darter etc) to be like the canaries in the coal mine. It’s a shame we can’t pay attention to the demise of just one species – it takes hundreds or thousands (of the kind we like to eat)to be on the brink before we sit up and notice.

  3. #6 by 1sttime0ffender on September 2, 2010 - 1:11 pm

    I am not what i would consider an intellectual, I am an average uneducated under-employeed Texas redneck. People are looking for something to be afraid of. One thing to blame is much easier to swallow than looking at the big picture. I am thrilled that yours was the first blog I had read here.

  4. #7 by Christian Beyer on September 2, 2010 - 1:19 pm

    Hey man, thanks for joining in. BTW – I checked out your blog and found it to be refreshingly frank, concise and insightful – probably due to that under-education – you can still think straight. 😉 We need more Texas rednecks on the web (though I hope you find work)

  5. #8 by logiopath on September 2, 2010 - 5:16 pm

    Okay–get a map of California and you will notice that Salinas isn’t anywhere near the Colorado River.

    Even George Lopez is on the side of the farmers–according to what he said, this is hurting tens of thousands of people who cannot run their businesses, not only farmers, but restaurants, feed stores, etc.

    To 1sttimeoffender–don’t be so nice to Chris–he’s liable to think this blog has some value.

  6. #9 by Christian Beyer on September 2, 2010 - 5:51 pm

    You’re right. The Colorado river isn’t diverted to Salinas – it supplies LA and Southern California with most of it’s drinking water BECAUSE the rest of the California water is being diverted to farms in arid regions like the Salinas Valley. (And if you look on the map, the Colorado river ain’t too close to LA, neither.)

    Long term irrigation of desert lands is inevitably doomed to failure. Poisonous salts located below the soil began to leach onto the surface, eventually making the land infertile. In the meantime irreparable harm is caused to bird and fish populations ( a lot of people still like fish, you know).

    And I’m surprise Lopez isn’t too concerned about the farmers who used to thrive along the Colorado river in Mexico. Now the river is just a mere trickle, with California, Nevada and Arizona pretty much sucking it dry. The US even built a desalinization plant on the Gulf of Mexico so they could have drinking water.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colorado_River_Aqueduct

    http://www.montereyherald.com/local/ci_14919022

    http://www.fws.gov/mountain-prairie/contaminants/contaminants4.html

    http://www.planetaazul.com.mx/www/2010/05/19/colorado-river-desalination-plant-gets-a-second-chance/

    • #10 by Christian Beyer on September 2, 2010 - 6:03 pm

      Of course, I don’t know what can be done to change the existing situation. But we don’t have to continue down this road.

  7. #11 by logiopathivorytowerdweller on September 2, 2010 - 8:08 pm

    Yeah, Yeah. Actually, much of the uber-liberal north takes water from Hetch-Hetchy, which once rivaled Yosemite in beauty.

    So, the envirofascists are just as guilty as those of us from the deep south of LA, Orange, and Riverside Counties.

    Of course, LA has turned the once non-desert Owens Valley into a barren wasteland, through taking water from Mono Lake.

  8. #12 by logiopathivorytowerdweller on September 2, 2010 - 8:09 pm

    Make that Owens Lake–Mono Lake is a salt lake already.

  9. #13 by anon on September 4, 2010 - 3:24 am

    it is an interesting phenomenon of human nature that natural disasters seem to have the effect of uniting people……..

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: